1
MARMEE MARCH
[as revenge, Amy has burned a precious manuscript] It is a very great loss and you have every right to be put out. But don't let the sun go down on your anger. Forgive each other, begin again tomorrow.
JO MARCH
I will never forgive her.
0
MARMEE MARCH
I am going to write this man a letter.
JO MARCH
A letter. That'll show him.
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MARMEE MARCH
Oh, Jo. Jo, you have so many extraordinary gifts; how can you expect to lead an ordinary life? You're ready to go out and - and find a good use for your talent. Tho' I don't know what I shall do without my Jo. Go, and embrace your liberty. And see what wonderful things come of it.
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MARMEE MARCH
[Jo has been to visit Aunt March to try and get money for a train ticket] 25? Can Aunt March spare this much?
JO MARCH
I couldn't bear to ask. [she takes off her hat, everyone gasps - she's got short hair] I sold my hair.
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JO MARCH
[uncovers John's eyes] Surprise!
MARMEE MARCH
John. You have a daughter.
HANNAH
And a son.
MEG MARCH
Oh, Marmee, I can't believe you did this four times.
JOHN BROOKE
Yes, but never two at once, my darling.
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MARMEE MARCH
Wouldn't this have made a wonderful school?
JO MARCH
A school.
MARMEE MARCH
Hmm. What a challenge that would be.
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MARMEE MARCH
I fear you would have a long engagement, three or four years. John must secure a house before you can marry and do his service to the union.
JO MARCH
John? Marry? You mean that poky old Mr Brooke? How did he weasel his way into this family?
MARMEE MARCH
Jo! Mr Brooke has been very kind to visit father in the hospital every day.
JO MARCH
He's dull as powder Meg, can't you at least marry someone amusing?
MEG MARCH
I'm fond of John, he's kind and serious and I'm not afraid of being poor.
JO MARCH
Marmee, you can't just let her go and marry him.
MEG MARCH
I'd hardly just go and marry anyone.
MARMEE MARCH
I would rather Meg marry for love and be a poor man's wife than marry for riches and lose her self-respect.
MEG MARCH
So, you don't mind that John is poor.
MARMEE MARCH
No, but I'd rather he have a house.
JO MARCH
Why must we marry at all? Why can't things just stay as they are?
MARMEE MARCH
It's just a proposal, nothing can be decided on. Now girls? Don't spoil the day.
0
MARMEE MARCH
Feminine weaknesses and fainting spells are the direct result of our confining young girls to the house, bent over their needlework, and restrictive corsets.
0
MARMEE MARCH
Cricket. Marmee's here. Icy cold. Jo, fetch a bowl with water, vinegar and some rags. Meg, my kit. We must draw the fever down from her head.
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MARMEE MARCH
[reading a letter] "Aunt March is bedridden and would not survive a sea voyage. Amy must bide her time and return later". [sighs] Just as well.